Ronnessa Brown: Mom, Mogul and Mentor Owning Excellence

We recently had the pleasure of interviewing Ronessa “Ronne” Brown, an entrepreneurial mogul, life coach, mentor, leader, mother, wife and all around giving woman. During our interview, we discovered how passionate she is about helping women find their own passion, her desire to continually give back to all people and her advice on how you too can step out of your comfort zone and own your creativity in “Excellence”!

WM: Tell us a little bit more about your background and where you grew up?

RB: I grew up in N.E Washington, D.C., it was a very rough area at that point in time, you know now everything is gentrified so the area has changed a lot.

 I went to Dunbar High School and growing up was very different for me because I was pregnant in high school. I was a teen mother at the age of 16 and through that I really had to work very hard to make sure that I graduated so that I could achieve my goals. I grew up in a crack house where my dad was dating a young lady on drugs at the time. I had to live in that type of environment until I got on my feet and launched my business.

 Living in that home space just pushed me and motivated me to get out of that environment and get out of that situation. So no, growing up wasn’t this peachy cream atmosphere for me. Growing up in D.C, attending Dunbar High School, pregnant at 16 just simply trying to make ends meet and overcome the odds.

WM: That is truly wonderful and inspiring, you are definitely a woman of strength and perseverance having to overcome such circumstances.  Can you tell us about a pivotal time in your life when you were able to dig yourself out of a place of doubt and fear to discover your own success?

RB:  Well for me I was honestly never in a place of fear. I never really feared where I was, I’ve always trusted God and I’ve always been a believer in Christ so when it came to fear and doubt I know that he is my ultimate provider so there was no question in my mind that he wouldn’t provide. I trusted God totally and completely so I wasn’t afraid. I knew that the things I was going through was literally going to end up on my resume, it was going to be the story I was going to tell to empower other women that will one day go through some of the same things I went through. I will say, that I knew that that was just a season in my life and regardless of what everyone told me because I was not able to go to college and wasn’t brought up in the best environment, I knew otherwise. I knew that God was a provider and that I had to get out of those circumstances. 

 I was tired of complaining, I was tired of telling people I hate my job. I was also tired of allowing people to fire me after people were done with me and my services, so instead of waiting for someone else to employ me I took matters into my own hands. At that time as a young mother it was a big deal to me, I was 19 years old and I had my second child and I was working at Georgetown Hospital as a janitor and I decided I needed to start something on the side it didn’t matter. I did not want to continue to live my life paycheck to paycheck.

And to be honest with you, my biggest push and the thing that motivated me the most was my children. Looking at my children everyday, entrepreneurship wasn’t about money, cars, buying a big house, it wasn’t about any of those things. It was truly about getting my children in a different environment, being able to provide for my kids, spend time with my kids and just being able to give my children a life that I have never experienced. So it was about being a parent that my children can truly look up to and say “I wana be like my mom when I row up because she works hard”.

WM:  Thank you for being so open and vulnerable and sharing with us your trials and triumphs. You are a successful life coach, entrepreneur and CEO, what was that light bulb moment when you were able to discover your passion and step into your purpose?

RB:  Well for me I feel like you recognize your passion through service-ship. So if you have yet to help people or offer information in some sort of fashion to other people then you don’t even know what your passion is. Because your passion has to supply some sort of need to someone else other than yourself. You will know what your purpose is because the majority of people will keep coming to you for that particular service or gift you are providing.

  People will know who you are and talk about you and that’s when you know you are truly operating in your call. So as I began to show people and help people how to start their own business inside and outside, help with branding and figuring out how to get them to make an income. I knew that was my gift. When I launched my best-friend’s company about three years ago and now she has a full service ballet studio and has over 250 children making 6 figures through her business. I packaged that together for her in doing her marketing ad and I got her first customer as soon as I put it on social media it went viral.  So when you can help someone like that and they can see the fruits of what you have given them through your service-ship that’s how you figure out your passion.

WM:  Now there is one of your organization’s that stuck out to me the most, “High Heels High Goals”. Can you tell me briefly what was the inspiration and creation behind that businesses? 

RB: So I was young starting the first one and I said that once I make it and become successful I am going to give back and be the person I needed when I was growing up. I would become the mentor and coach I wish I had back then and that’s exactly what I did when I created High Heels High Goals. HHG is a non profit organization and we help women in so many different ways such as grants, providing services for starting businesses, free CPA services, free website for their business, etc. We provide the tools needed to give to women who are transitioning into entrepreneurship. 

WM: What advice can you give to those women out there struggling to find their niche and passion towards entrepreneurship?

RB: Well, I would say be patient and be still. Right now entrepreneurship is kind of looking almost like a trend, everybody wants to be an entrepreneur and unfortunately everyone is not called to be an entrepreneur. Meaning that you can feel so pressured into thinking that I need to do this as well and you take on things that you shouldn’t and try to be someone your not and you get out of your lane. So my advice is make sure that you are truly called to do whatever you are attempting to do or whoever your trying to be you have to be passionate about it.

Secondly, everything doesn’t have to be all about money. I want to tell everyone who is listening to this interview that money will only motivate you for a short period of time. I remember not having money and thinking it was the end all and be all solution to every problem. But two things happen one as you grow spiritual you recognize that money is a tool to help you appreciate all of things you already have in your life. Like your children, family, friends a quite place that is a piece of mind, then you recognize money isn’t everything.  

 The enthusiasm and push for the money will be over real fast. You have to truly do something you love, because that’s going to be the only thing that’s going to keep you. Then lastly, my biggest tip is to always remain coachable at all times throughout your journey. Because many people think that they have arrived and I know from my own experience that I am always looking for mentorship and new wisdom because I know I can always learn so much more. I have literally transformed so much being open to learning from people that have done more than me so being coachable is really important.    

What’s next for this WOE-Preneur? Well she has recently launched The Girl CEO Planner designed to help women balance their busy lifestyles and accomplish goals in excellence!

 

To stay updated with what’s happening in Ronessa’s world, be sure to subscribe to Ronneb.com and follow her on Instagram @ronnebrown.

 

Written By
More from WOE Staff

Fibroids: The Silent Epidemic That’s Screaming in Our Community

Fibroids are more common in African-American women than in women of other...
Read More